Discussion:
"Death Panels" At The New York Times
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D. Spencer Hines
2017-07-13 01:31:27 UTC
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Raw Message
Hmmmmmmmm...

The Penalties For Fake News.

Markets Get To Decide.

Joseph Alois Schumpeter's: "CREATIVE DESTRUCTION"

DSH

Lux et Veritas et Libertas
--------------------------------------------------

'Death panels' to break pink-slip news to dozens of NY Times copy editors

By Keith J. Kelly July 11, 2017 | 10:19pm
The New York Post

'Death panels' to break pink-slip news to dozens of NY Times copy editors

New York Times employees hold signs during a temporary strike in June in
support of copy editors.

While buyout talks continue, it currently looks like the number of editors
who will be given pink slips at the New York Times will be around 60,
sources tell Media Ink.

The seven two-person teams of editors breaking the news to those who are
staying and to those who are going are being referred to in the newsroom as
"death panels," insiders said.

As part of a streamlining process unveiled by Executive Editor Dean Baquet
and Managing Editor Joe Kahn, the title of copy editor and backfield editor
is being eliminated.

The Times has not disclosed how many jobs that involves - but the News Guild
of New York puts that number at around 110 people.

Roughly 65 new editors who will supervise video and copy will be hired - up
from an earlier estimate of only 50 new jobs.

Copy editors can apply, but there is no guarantee they will be offered new
jobs.

News Guild of New York president Grant Glickson, who has blasted the
cutbacks, is holding a meeting at 3 p.m. Wednesday with union members at the
Times.

Many copy editors who were called into second interviews last week expecting
that they were "call back" interviews leading to a new job were instead
encouraged to take a buyout package.

Insiders have until July 20 to decide to take the buyout.

"Some of the people being let go are top-notch editors who have given
decades of their lives to the Times," said one insider. "And obviously, they're
devastated. But the morale of the people who are staying isn't much better."

"It's not just that they're sad to see talented colleagues laid off, they
also have zero confidence in management and in the latest reorganization of
the newsroom," the insider said.

The Times' downsizing is the second reorganization to hit the editorial
ranks in less than a year.

"If that doesn't amount to an obvious management debacle, I don't know what
does," said our source.
Tiglath
2017-07-13 05:50:08 UTC
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Raw Message
This is like a German in Normandy on D-day afternoon worrying about too much
salt in his Camembert.

I can't blame you either for trying to change the subject.

Anyone with experience in intelligence matters would recognize the Russian
modus operandi in this collusion business, it seems. Maybe Mr. Hines agrees.

A most private way to collude would be directly between Putin and Trump, but direct implication is extremely unwise. Instead Russians string out a chain of government officials which links with another chain of non-government civilians, so that if things go south there are numerous people (buffers, actually) who provide denials, and multiple denial accounts are far more convincing that one. Any serious traceback attempt can be thwarted by eliminating a number of links
in the chain, subject to requirements.

Ruskies are talented, they've been on our tail since 1945, and in intelligence
operations are catching up and overtaking.

We do plenty of unreported cyber harm to Russia, I believe, but is this how we
want to live?

The most vulnerable people to stealthy hackers are those most heavily invested
in the technology that enables them, and that would be us.

We must invent the computer.

Again.

Right this time.
Post by D. Spencer Hines
Hmmmmmmmm...
The Penalties For Fake News.
Markets Get To Decide.
Joseph Alois Schumpeter's: "CREATIVE DESTRUCTION"
DSH
Lux et Veritas et Libertas
--------------------------------------------------
'Death panels' to break pink-slip news to dozens of NY Times copy editors
By Keith J. Kelly July 11, 2017 | 10:19pm
The New York Post
'Death panels' to break pink-slip news to dozens of NY Times copy editors
New York Times employees hold signs during a temporary strike in June in
support of copy editors.
While buyout talks continue, it currently looks like the number of editors
who will be given pink slips at the New York Times will be around 60,
sources tell Media Ink.
The seven two-person teams of editors breaking the news to those who are
staying and to those who are going are being referred to in the newsroom as
"death panels," insiders said.
As part of a streamlining process unveiled by Executive Editor Dean Baquet
and Managing Editor Joe Kahn, the title of copy editor and backfield editor
is being eliminated.
The Times has not disclosed how many jobs that involves - but the News Guild
of New York puts that number at around 110 people.
Roughly 65 new editors who will supervise video and copy will be hired - up
from an earlier estimate of only 50 new jobs.
Copy editors can apply, but there is no guarantee they will be offered new
jobs.
News Guild of New York president Grant Glickson, who has blasted the
cutbacks, is holding a meeting at 3 p.m. Wednesday with union members at the
Times.
Many copy editors who were called into second interviews last week expecting
that they were "call back" interviews leading to a new job were instead
encouraged to take a buyout package.
Insiders have until July 20 to decide to take the buyout.
"Some of the people being let go are top-notch editors who have given
decades of their lives to the Times," said one insider. "And obviously, they're
devastated. But the morale of the people who are staying isn't much better."
"It's not just that they're sad to see talented colleagues laid off, they
also have zero confidence in management and in the latest reorganization of
the newsroom," the insider said.
The Times' downsizing is the second reorganization to hit the editorial
ranks in less than a year.
"If that doesn't amount to an obvious management debacle, I don't know what
does," said our source.
Robert Mulain
2017-07-13 15:54:58 UTC
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Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Tiglath
This is like a German in Normandy on D-day afternoon worrying about too much
salt in his Camembert.
I can't blame you either for trying to change the subject.
Anyone with experience in intelligence matters would recognize the Russian
modus operandi in this collusion business, it seems. Maybe Mr. Hines agrees.
A most private way to collude would be directly between Putin and Trump, but direct implication is extremely unwise. Instead Russians string out a chain of government officials which links with another chain of non-government civilians, so that if things go south there are numerous people (buffers, actually) who provide denials, and multiple denial accounts are far more convincing that one. Any serious traceback attempt can be thwarted by eliminating a number of links
in the chain, subject to requirements.
Ruskies are talented, they've been on our tail since 1945, and in intelligence
operations are catching up and overtaking.
Ahem - surely well before 1945? Stalin, the devious old bastard, was unable to even 'fake' surprise when told of the atomic bomb - and little wonder (no doubt he had three or four already under test!)
Post by Tiglath
We do plenty of unreported cyber harm to Russia, I believe, but is this how we
want to live?
The most vulnerable people to stealthy hackers are those most heavily invested
in the technology that enables them, and that would be us.
We must invent the computer.
Again.
Right this time.
Once again, ahem! Had you stuck to the original British Patent there would have been none of this nonsense..... and of course the attached security regulations..

Same as the Russkies with the RR jet engine which powered the MiG15 etc so wonderfully...
Post by Tiglath
Post by D. Spencer Hines
Hmmmmmmmm...
The Penalties For Fake News.
Markets Get To Decide.
Always, invariably a very, very bad way!
Post by Tiglath
Post by D. Spencer Hines
Joseph Alois Schumpeter's: "CREATIVE DESTRUCTION"
DSH
Lux et Veritas et Libertas
--------------------------------------------------
'Death panels' to break pink-slip news to dozens of NY Times copy editors
By Keith J. Kelly July 11, 2017 | 10:19pm
The New York Post
'Death panels' to break pink-slip news to dozens of NY Times copy editors
New York Times employees hold signs during a temporary strike in June in
support of copy editors.
While buyout talks continue, it currently looks like the number of editors
who will be given pink slips at the New York Times will be around 60,
sources tell Media Ink.
The seven two-person teams of editors breaking the news to those who are
staying and to those who are going are being referred to in the newsroom as
"death panels," insiders said.
As part of a streamlining process unveiled by Executive Editor Dean Baquet
and Managing Editor Joe Kahn, the title of copy editor and backfield editor
is being eliminated.
The Times has not disclosed how many jobs that involves - but the News Guild
of New York puts that number at around 110 people.
Roughly 65 new editors who will supervise video and copy will be hired - up
from an earlier estimate of only 50 new jobs.
Copy editors can apply, but there is no guarantee they will be offered new
jobs.
News Guild of New York president Grant Glickson, who has blasted the
cutbacks, is holding a meeting at 3 p.m. Wednesday with union members at the
Times.
Many copy editors who were called into second interviews last week expecting
that they were "call back" interviews leading to a new job were instead
encouraged to take a buyout package.
Insiders have until July 20 to decide to take the buyout.
"Some of the people being let go are top-notch editors who have given
decades of their lives to the Times," said one insider. "And obviously, they're
devastated. But the morale of the people who are staying isn't much better."
"It's not just that they're sad to see talented colleagues laid off, they
also have zero confidence in management and in the latest reorganization of
the newsroom," the insider said.
The Times' downsizing is the second reorganization to hit the editorial
ranks in less than a year.
"If that doesn't amount to an obvious management debacle, I don't know what
does," said our source.
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